thepigandwhistle:

How to debone a chicken and make a damn mess (pics by the ole lady):

Get your muthafuckin mise on.  Chop the flats off the wings and leave the lil drums, slice down the back, cut the tendons on the lil drum drums.  Pull the drum and the breast away from the center mass leaving the tenderloins on the carcass, flip chicken over, dislocate hip joints, pull down the back of the chicken until you get the oysters exposed.  Cut them out and cut the tendons around the hips/thigh bones, brute force tug the center carcass away from the rest of the meat on the board.

Leave the thigh and drumstick bones together and scrape/push the meat away from the bones.  Break the bone at the little bottom knuckle with the back of your knife and remove the thigh and drum bone whole from the drum.  Take the tenderloins off the carcass and place in the absent meat space between the thigh and breast on each side.  You can take the little drumettes off now if you like.  Spice it, roll it up, bind it, cook it.

My schooling on this one came from Jacques Pepin.  The ole lady got me his french techniques book for Christmas last year and this is one of the cooler things in there.  He has a video on youtube making my technique look silly if you care to search it.  

Have fun dudes and duderinas.

thepigandwhistle:

A very special day at The Pig and Whistle.  That wonderful bone-in leg of lamb we cured for about fifteen days and hung to dry for about seventy came out of the curing chamber this afternoon.  Lamb prosciutto!

Covered in good mold that showed up naturally, we took it down, unbound it, and sliced some off in line with the bone.  Sweet, spicy, and full of great herbyness, this shit is off the couch.  A good intro to whole muscle, bone in, curing.

So happy right now.

This dude is the TRUTH.

thepigandwhistle:

How to make a hot dog:

Fatty beef, debone, grind, salt/pink salt, cure in fridge for two/three days, season, regrind, emulsify, sheep casings ho!, stuff, dry, smoke.

Grill, eat.

This dude.

trevorgeoffrey:

America’s Best Charcuterie.
Cured Meats
1. Speck: Olli Salumeria, Manakin, VA Imagine prosciutto that took a trip to Northern Italy, spent a few hours in a smokehouse, and got dusted with pepper. $11 for 4 oz., sliced; murrayscheese.com 2. Mocetta (Bresaola Piccola): Creminelli Prime Meats, Salt Lake City Think of bresaola—paper-thin air-dried beef—as jerky with an Italian accent.  $75 for 2.2 lb.; creminelli.com Pate 3. House-Made Rabbit Pate: Formaggio Kitchen, Cambridge, MA It’s hard not to like rabbit when it’s combined with pancetta, Madeira, and pistachios  and then wrapped in prosciutto. $13 for 1/2 lb.; formaggiokitchen.comCured Sausage 4. Chorizo Navarre: Olympic Provisions, Portland, OR Spanish chorizo (don’t confuse it with the fresh Mexican variety) gets its fiery red  color from smoked paprika and cayenne. $10 for about 6 oz.; olympicprovisions.com 5. Finochietta: Salumeria Biellese, NYC Classic Tuscan salami (flavored with both fennel seed and fennel pollen) from a legendary maker. $15 for 1 lb.; salumeriabiellese.comSpreads 6. Nduja: Boccalone, San Francisco The idea of soft, spicy salami may sound odd, but slathered on warm  bread, this Calabrian-style paste will no doubt become your latest  addiction. $24 for about 8 oz.; boccalone.com  7. Iowa White Spread: La Quercia, Norwalk, IA  An unctuous blend of cured prosciutto fat, ground coriander, rosemary,  and bay leaf. If butter went to heaven, this is what it would taste  like. $10 for 1 lb.; laquercia.usThe Oddball 8. Coffee Lomo: Salt & Time, Austin, TX  One of the crowning achievements of America’s recent charcuterie boom:  Spanish-style pork loin rubbed with wood-roasted coffee, chile, and  cumin, then cured for four months. $7 for 2 oz., sliced; saltandtime.com

I’ll be in my bunk

trevorgeoffrey:

America’s Best Charcuterie.

Cured Meats

1. Speck: Olli Salumeria, Manakin, VA
Imagine prosciutto that took a trip to Northern Italy, spent a few hours in a smokehouse, and got dusted with pepper. $11 for 4 oz., sliced; murrayscheese.com

2. Mocetta (Bresaola Piccola): Creminelli Prime Meats, Salt Lake City
Think of bresaola—paper-thin air-dried beef—as jerky with an Italian accent. $75 for 2.2 lb.; creminelli.com 

Pate

3. House-Made Rabbit Pate: Formaggio Kitchen, Cambridge, MA
It’s hard not to like rabbit when it’s combined with pancetta, Madeira, and pistachios and then wrapped in prosciutto. $13 for 1/2 lb.; formaggiokitchen.com

Cured Sausage

4. Chorizo Navarre: Olympic Provisions, Portland, OR
Spanish chorizo (don’t confuse it with the fresh Mexican variety) gets its fiery red color from smoked paprika and cayenne. $10 for about 6 oz.; olympicprovisions.com

5. Finochietta: Salumeria Biellese, NYC
Classic Tuscan salami (flavored with both fennel seed and fennel pollen) from a legendary maker. $15 for 1 lb.; salumeriabiellese.com

Spreads

6. Nduja: Boccalone, San Francisco
The idea of soft, spicy salami may sound odd, but slathered on warm bread, this Calabrian-style paste will no doubt become your latest addiction. $24 for about 8 oz.; boccalone.com

7. Iowa White Spread: La Quercia, Norwalk, IA
An unctuous blend of cured prosciutto fat, ground coriander, rosemary, and bay leaf. If butter went to heaven, this is what it would taste like. $10 for 1 lb.; laquercia.us

The Oddball

8. Coffee Lomo: Salt & Time, Austin, TX
One of the crowning achievements of America’s recent charcuterie boom: Spanish-style pork loin rubbed with wood-roasted coffee, chile, and cumin, then cured for four months. $7 for 2 oz., sliced; saltandtime.com

I’ll be in my bunk